Ingleby, Helen

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Ingleby, Helen

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Dates of existence

1890-1973

History

Born in Norfolk. The daughter of MP for Kings Lynn. Studied music at the Royal College of Music prior to entering the London Medical School for Women, where she completed her pre-clinical training in 1914. During the First World War she worked at French Red Cross in a military hospital.

Started her studies at St George's Hospital Medical School in 1915 along with three other female students (Hetty Ethelberta Claremont, Mariam Bostock and Elizabeth O'Flynn). Qualified in 1916, MB 1916. Worked at St George's Hospital as curator of the Pathological Museum, medical registrar and house physician.

Worked at the Victoria Hospital for Children and South London Hospital for Women. Lecturer in pathology at King's College Hospital. Received a fellowship to study at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA, in 1923. Worked at the Women's Hospital in Philadelphia. Professor at the Albert Einstein Medical Centre in Philadelphia. Published on comparative anatomy, pathology and roentgenology of the breast, and received her MD in 1954, almost 40 years after qualifying as a doctor.

Retired to Norfolk. Died in 1973, aged 83.

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406

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Sources

SGUL Archives; SG Hospital Gazette XXIII (1), Jan 1920; 'Memoir of Helen Ingleby', M. Fay (1974)

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