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Rare Books

  • GB 406 RB
  • Collection
  • 1532-1994

Collection of rare books accumulated by the medical school library when it was originally located at Hyde Park Corner, in central London. Also contains books collected by the medical school library when it relocated in 1976 to Tooting, London.

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

Papers of St George's, University of London

  • 406 SGHMS
  • Collection
  • 1752-2021

The collection contains records created by St George's, University of London (formerly known as St George's Hospital Medical School). Medical school records include:

  • Minutes and papers of the School Council, Academic Board and other committees, 1862-2000

  • Student registers, record cards and certificates, 1752-1970s

  • Manuscripts relating to the early administration of the medical school

  • Institutional publications including school yearbooks, 1990-2014; directories, calendars and prospectus' relating to the school, 1852-c.1960

  • Photographs relating to the medical school and St George's Hospital, including photos of staff, students, events and sports teams, 19th century-21st century

  • Other miscellaneous materials

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

Student records

Records consist of student admission registers and records cards; student photographs; student certificates, tickets and register of prizes; includes other miscellaneous papers relating to students

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

Post Mortem Examinations and Case Books

  • 406 PM
  • Collection
  • 1840-1946

The post mortem records contain manuscript case notes, with medical notes both pre and post mortem. These include details on patients’ admission to the hospital, treatments and medication administered to patients and the medical history of patients; the medical histories were copied into the volumes from hospital registers, which are no longer extant. The post mortem cases include detailed pathological findings made during the detailed examination of the body after death. From the 1880s onwards the case books contain original anatomical drawings and photographs.

For more information and updates about the project, see our project page

The following information is recorded for each case. The information is transcribed from the case notes and/or the relevant index and, where relevant, additionally standardised using MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)

• Name of the patient. If a name is not entered in the volume, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No name stated]’

• Gender of the patient (female / male / unknown)

• Age of the patient. Usually in numbers, following the original, with the following exceptions: 4/12 = 4 months, 4/52 = 4 weeks, 4/365 = 4 days. If no age is entered, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No age stated]’

• Occupation of the patient. Where no occupation is entered, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No occupation stated]’. Children are often designated according to their father’s or mother’s occupation and women by their husband’s occupation (e.g. ‘F / Horsekeeper’, ‘M. Charwoman’, ‘Hd Grocer’); these have been rendered in the catalogue as ‘[Child of] Horsekeeper’, ‘[Wife of] Grocer’

• Date of admission and date of death

• The names of the doctors treating or examining the patient. ‘Admitted under the care of’ denotes the senior doctor in charge of the case (usually entered at the top of the page and in the index); ‘Post mortem performed by’ denotes the doctor responsible for the post mortem examination (usually signed at the bottom of the page) and ‘Medical examination performed by’ denotes the doctor responsible for the medical examination prior to death (usually signed at the bottom of the page). The earliest records usually contain only one name, and some of the later ones may contain multiple names in each category. An authority record (name access point) with basic biographical details has been created for each doctor mentioned in the records; these can be used to explore all the cases related to a particular individual

• Disease(s) or cause of death of the patient. Transcribed from the medical case and/or the index and standardised, e.g. ‘Disease (transcribed): Phthisis. Fractured base. Disease (standardised): Tuberculosis (lungs). Fracture (skull)’

• Medical and post mortem notes. Brief summary description or transcription of the case notes relating to previous medical history (not a full transcription of the case notes)

• Note on whether the case includes illustrations or photographs; these can also be browsed via genre access points

• Note on whether the death was caused by trauma, accident or suicide

• Subject access points, using standardised terms from MeSH, with disease type (e.g. respiratory tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases) and anatomy type (e.g. cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system), which can be used for browsing all relevant cases

Note on transcriptions and abbreviations

Names have been silently expanded, e.g. Jas = James, Wm = William

Some common abbreviations and acronyms

AMCH = Atkinson Morley Convalescent Hospital, Wimbledon
BID = Brought in dead
COA = Condition on admission
F = Father
H or Hd = Husband
HP = House physician
HS = House surgeon
IP = In-patient
L = Left
M = Mother
MR or Med reg or Med r = Medical register or Medical registrar
MS = Museum specimen
OP = Out-patient
OPD = Out-patient department
OR = Obstetric register
PMH = Previous medical history
PH = Previous history
Pt or Pat = Patient
PM = Post mortem
R = Right
RF = Rheumatic fever
Ry = Railway
SR or Surg reg = Surgical register or Surgical registrar
TB = Tuberculosis
VD = Venereal disease

St George's Hospital, London

St George's nursing collection

  • NU
  • Collection
  • 1860-2011

Collection charting the development of nursing education at St George's and related institutions from the 19th century to the present day.

The collection includes
• Student registers, training and examination records, prospectuses and syllabi
• Administrative records, including committee minutes, reports, rules and regulations
• Publications and printed material such as newsletters and journals, including those published by St George’s Nurses’ League (1952­-2014)
• Papers, photographs and artefacts by St George’s Nurses’ League
• Personal papers, memoirs and memorabilia from individual nurses, including papers of matron Dame Muriel Powell (c.1910s-­1970s)
• Photographs, including student photographs, group photographs and personal photo albums by nurses
• Artefacts and objects, including clothing such as nurses’ caps, badges and medical instruments
• Papers from the Joint Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education at Kingston University and SGUL relating to nursing (1880­-1980), including
• ‘Nurses’ Voices’: Oral histories (interviews with St George’s nurses and midwives) and related documentation, recorded in 2010, documenting nursing at St George’s 1930-­1990

From in-­job training at the hospital, nursing education was gradually formalised during the latter half of the 19th century. From 1882 onwards, probationer nurses were offered lectures by the medical school and hospital staff; these lectures developed into a more formal syllabus, becoming compulsory for probationers in the 1890s, and the first formal examinations were introduced in 1894. The archive charts the development of nursing education from the late 19th century to the 21st century, including important changes in the demographics of the nursing staff, including the Windrush generation.

The collection encompasses training of nurses at St George’s and related institutions; for instance, nursing training at Victoria Hospital for Children and Grove Hospital were merged with St George’s School of Nursing in the 1950s, leading to the establishment of a branch of the School of Nursing at Tooting, where St George’s Hospital and Medical School (later university) moved in the 1970s from Hyde Park Corner, central London. Nursing education at St George’s is currently offered by the Faculty
of Health, Social Care and Education, a joint faculty of Kingston University and St George’s, University of London.

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

St George's Hospital and Medical School Annual Reports

Annual reports generated by the St George's Hospital and the medical school. The volumes include statistics and annual reports of patients treated at the hospital as well as articles by the staff of the hospital and external contributors.

Volumes I-VI (one volume per year 1866-1871) and Volume VII (1872-1874) were edited by John William Ogle and Timothy Holmes.

Volume VIII (1874-1867) was edited by William Howship Dickinson and Timothy Holmes.

Volume IX (1877-1878) was edited by William Howship Dickinson and Thomas Pickering Pick.

Volume X (1879) was edited by Thomas Tillyer Whipham and Thomas Pickering Pick.

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

St George's Hospital Reports, Vol. I

The volume includes a brief history of the hospital and the medical school.

Contents:
I. Some Account of St. George’s Hospital and School. By W. E. PAGE, M.D., Senior Physician to the Hospital
II. Contributions to the Surgery of the Head. No. I. On the Deviations of the Base of the Skull in Chronic Hydrocephalus. By PRESCOTT HEWETT, Surgeon to the Hospital
III. A Case of Meningocele, in the Occipital Region, which was injected with Iodine, without ill consequences, the Patient dying of Broncho-pneumonia. By T. HOLMES, Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Anatomy
IV. On the Typhus Epidemic of 1864-5, as observed at St. George’s Hospital. By R. E. THOMPSON, M.D., Medical Registrar of the Hospital
V. Notes on an Epidemic of Typhus at Leeds, in the Year 1865-6. By T. CLIFFORD ALLBUTT, M.B., Physician to the Fever Infimmary, Fever Hospital, &0. at Leeds
VI. On the Diagnosis, Pathology, and Treatment of Progressive Locomotor Ataxy. By J. LOCKHART CLARKE, F.R.S.
VII. On Rheumatic Iritis. By J. ROUSE, Lecturer on Anatomy at the Hospital School
VIII. On Cerebral Symptoms occurring in certain Affections of the Ear. By J. TOYNBEE, F.R.S., late Consulting Aural Surgeon to St. Mary’s Hospital, Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, and to St. George’s and St. James’s Dispensary
IX. On some Points connected with the Treatment of Hernia. By J. WARRINGTON HAWARD, Resident Medical Oflicer to the Hospital for Sick Children
X. On Amputation at the Hip-joint, and on the Applicability of this Operation in some of the worst Cases of Morbus Coxarius. Part I. For recurrent Fibro-plastic Tumour. Part II. In Morbus Coxarius. By T. HOLMES, Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital
XI. On Disease of the Brain as a result of Diabetes Mellitus, illustrated by the Narrative of a Case (with Clinical Observations) in which Paralysis, due to Softening of the Brain, came on in a Diabetic Patient, and proved fatal. Followed by a Notice of Fifteen Fatal Cases of Diabetes, cited from the Records of the Hospital. By Dr. JOHN W. OGLE, Physician to the Hospital
XII. On Jaundice and Biliousness. By Dr. H. BENCE JONES, formerly Physician to the Hospital
XIII. On Paralysis occurring in Childbed. By Dr. F. F. FUSSELL, Physician to the Brighton Dispensary
XIV. Remarks upon the Modus Operandi of Hypodermic Injections. By C. HUNTER, Surgeon to the Royal Pimlico Dispensary
XV. On Congenital Dislocations of the Femur. By B. E. BRODHURST, Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital
XVI. On the Diurnal Variations in the Temperature of the Human Body in Health. By Dr. WILLIAM OGLE, Lecturer on Physiology at the Medical School of the Hospital
XVII. On Rupture of Arteries dependent on external Injury. By GEORGE POLLOCK, Surgeon to the Hospital
XVIII. On the Formation of Coagula in the Cerebral Arteries. By Dr. DICKINSON, Assistant Physician to the Hospital
XIX. On Talipes Varus. By B. E. BRODHURST, Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital
XX. On Talipes Equinus. By G. NAYLER, Assistant Surgeon to the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, and the Hospital for Diseases of the Skin
XXI. On the Amputation-Book of St. George’s Hospital, and on some Points connected with the Statistics of Three Hundred Amputations there recorded. Part I. On the Influence of Age upon the Results of Amputation. Part II. 'On the Causes of Death, after Amputation; with special reference to the proportion of Deaths due to causes preceding the Amputation. By T. HOLMES, Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital
XXII. Statistical Tables from the Dental Case-Books of St. George’s Hospital. By C. VASEY, Surgeon-Dentist to the Hospital
Annual Report of Cases admitted into the Medical Wards of St. George’s Hospital during the Year 1865. By Dr. STURGES
Annual Report of Surgical Cases treated in the Hospital during the Year 1865. By Mr. PICK

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
View of St. George’s Hospital in its present condition
View of the Hospital as it appeared in 1746. From a picture by R. Wilson, R.A., in the Foundling Hospital
Foetal Skull, showing the arrangement of the bones in a case of chronic hydrocephalus, affecting the middle fossae (Mr. Prescott Hewett)
The representation, from life, of a case similar to the foregoing (Mr. Prescott Hewett)
Meningocele in the occipital region (Mr. Holmes)
The same as above, showing the parts within the skull (Mr. Holmes)
Thermograph, in a case of fever (Dr. Thompson)
Diseased Femur (Mr. H. Lee) .
Stump of amputation (Mr. H. Lee)
Lithographic representation of -a Femur, showing the effects of chronic Osteo-myelitis (Mr. Holmes)
Consolidated Lung, having its arteries full of laminated coagulum (Dr. John W. Ogle)
Thermographs showing variations of temperature in health (Dr. William Ogle)
Front view of a case of Talipes equinus (Mr. Nayler)
Back view of the same preparation (Mr. Nayler)
An extreme case of Talipes equinus (Mr. Nayler)
The same foot after successful treatment (Mr. Nayler)
Contraction of the ext. prop. pollicis, with rectangular contraction of the tendo Achillis (Mr. Nayler) .
Talipes equinus paralytieus (Mr. Nayler)
Extreme degree of Talipes equinus paralyticus (Mr. Nayler)

St George's Hospital Reports, Vol. III

CONTENTS
I. On the Treatment of Rheumatic Fever. By HENRY WILLIAM FULLER, M.D., Senior Physician to the Hospital
II. Cases of Delirium probably dependent on Impoverishment of the Blood. By A. W. BARCLAY, M.D., Physician to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Physic
III. Abstract of Clinical Lectures. By HENRY LEE, Surgeon to the Hospital
IV. Case of Cerebral Disease in a Syphilitic Patient. By T. CLIFFORD ALLBUTT, M.D., Physician to the Leeds General Infirmary
V. On the Reduction of old Dislocations. By BERNARD E. BRODHURST, Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital
VI. On Traumatic Fever. By THOMAS P. PICK, Curator of the Pathological Museum
VII. On Paralysis of the Extensors. By REGINALD THOMPSON, M.D., F.R.S., Medical Registrar to the Hospital
VIII. Are there special Trophic Nerves? By HANDFIELD JONES, M.D., F.R.S., Physician to St. Mary’s Hospital
IX. On improved Methods of inducing and accelerating Labour, with the view of obtaining increased safety to Mother and Child. By ROBERT BARNES, M.D., Lecturer on Midwifery, &c. St. Thomas’s Hospital
X. On Counter-Irritation, considered in reference to the remote and indirect effects of local morbid changes. By W. H. DICKINSON, M.D., Assistant Physician to the Hospital
XI. A Hypothesis as to the ultimate destination of Glycogen. By WILLIAM OGLE, M.D., Assistant Physician to, and Lecturer on Physiology at the Hospital
XII. Case of Poisoning by Stramonium. By C. PAGET BLAKE, M.D. Edin., M.R.C.P. Lond., Consulting Physician to the Torbay Infirmary and Dispensary
XIII. Loss of Speech from the Bite of Venomous Snakes. By WILLIAM OGLE, M.D., Assistant Physician to the Hospital
XIV. Upon certain Morbid Conditions of the Appendages of the Liver. By JOHN W. OGLE, M.D., Physician to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Pathology
XV. A Case of Aneurysm. By R. J. LEE, M.B.
XVI. A Series of Fatal Cases of Poisoning. By JOHN W. OGLE, M.D., Physician to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Pathology
XVII. On the Treatment of Wounds by the application, of Carbolic Acid, on Lister’s method; showing the results of a Series of Cases so treated in this Hospital during the last few months. By T. HOLMES, Surgeon to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Surgery; and W. B. HOLDERNESSE, House-Surgeon to the Hospital
XVIII. Ophthalmic Department Report. By HENRY POWER, Ophthalmic Surgeon to the Hospital
XIX. Pathological Observations. By THOMAS P. PICK, Curator of the Pathological Museum
XX. Report of the Medical Cases admitted during the year 1867-8. By REGINALD E. THOMPSON, M.D., Medical Registrar
XXI. Report of the Surgical Cases treated during the year 1867. By WILLIAM LEIGH, Surgical Registrar
XXII. Address to the Students of the Hospital on the Opening of the New School, October 1,1868. By HENRY W. ACLAND, Regius Professor of Medicine in the University of Oxford, and Honorary Physician to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Diagram of Medio-lateral Operation for Lithotomy
Obstruction of Bile-duct by enlarged Glands
Cyst of Pancreas, the result of Obstruction of its Duct
TWO Views of Aneurysm of the Aorta
Diagrams explanatory of this Case
Coloured Lithographs illustrating Cases in the Ophthalmic Report

St George's Hospital Reports, Vol. IV

CONTENTS:
I. On the Variations of the Acidity of the Urine that occur when Vegetable and Mineral Acids are used. By H. BENCE JONES, Esq.
II. A Case of Angina Pectoris. With Remarks. By J. LOCKHART CLARKE, M.D.
III. Notes on the Subcutaneous Injection of Morphia. By EDWARD T. WILSON, M.D.
IV. On Rheumatic Pericarditis. By REGINALD E. THOMPSON, M.D.
V. Cases of Syphilitic Disease of the Nervous System. By T. CLIFFORD ALLBUTT, M.D.
VI. Clinical Observations on Acute Tubercle. By EDWARD LONG Fox, M.D.
VII. Contributions to the Surgery of the Head : Sebaceous Tumours of the Cranial Region. By PRESCOTT HEWÉTT, Esq., Senior Surgeon to the Hospital .
VIII. On Inflammation of the Retina. By GEORGE COWELL, Esq., Assistant Surgeon to the Westminster Hospital ; Ophthalmic Surgeon to the Victoria Hospital for Children .
IX. On Chronic Bone- and Joint-Disease. By J. WARRINGTON HAWARD, Esq.
X. The Causes of Pulmonary Consumption. By CHARLES THEODORE WILLIAMS, M.D.
XI. Exophthalmic Goître. By W. B. CHEADLE, M.D.
XII. Clinical Notes on unusual Surgical Cases. By H. LEE, Esq., Surgeon to the Hospital
XIII. Reminiscences of Cases from Private Practice. By J. NICHOLLS, M.D., Chelmsford
XIV. Two Cases of Excision of the Scapula. With Remarks. By GEORGE POLLOCK, Esq., Surgeon to the Hospital .
XV. Note on Excision of the Ankle-joint. By T. HOLMES, Esq., Surgeon to the Hospital
XVI. On Aphasia. By W. WADHAM, M.D., Physician to the Hospital.
XVII. On the Treatment of Acute Orchitis. By J. ROUSE, Esq., Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital
XVIII, Remarks on a Case of Locomotor Ataxy with Hydrarthrosis. By T. C. ALLBUTT, M.D.
XIX. Report of the Curator of the Pathological Museum. By T. P. PICK, Esq., Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital .
XX. Annual Report of Medical Cases during the year 1868. By REGINALD THOMPSON, M.D., Medical Registrar
XXI. Annual Report of Surgical Cases during the year 1868. By W. LEIGH, Esq., Surgical Registrar
Supplement to Dr. Clifford Allbutt's Article on Syphilitic Disease of the Nervous System
Prospectus of the Medical School for 1869-70, showing the arrangements for Lectures and Hospital Practice, the Prizes and Exhibitions, with List of Prizemen for 1869.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Tables showing Variations in the Acidity of the Urine (Dr. Bence Jones)
Tables showing Variations in the Pulse and Temperature in Acute Tubercle and other Diseases (Dr. Cheadle)
Pulse-traces in Exophthalmic Goître
Exfoliated Portion of the Humerus in & Case of Compound Fracture, with Recovery of the Use of the Arm (Dr. Nicholls)
Portrait of a Patient after Recovery from Excision of the Scapula (Mr. Pollock)
Anterior View of a Tumour of the Scapula, removed by Excision (Mr. Pollock)
Posterior View of the same (Mr. Pollock)
Bones removed in a Case of Excision of the Ankle-joint (Mr. Holmes)
The lower surface of the Astragalus in the same Case (Mr. Holmes)

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