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Barclay, Andrew Whyte Pathology
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St George's Hospital Reports, Vol. III

CONTENTS
I. On the Treatment of Rheumatic Fever. By HENRY WILLIAM FULLER, M.D., Senior Physician to the Hospital
II. Cases of Delirium probably dependent on Impoverishment of the Blood. By A. W. BARCLAY, M.D., Physician to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Physic
III. Abstract of Clinical Lectures. By HENRY LEE, Surgeon to the Hospital
IV. Case of Cerebral Disease in a Syphilitic Patient. By T. CLIFFORD ALLBUTT, M.D., Physician to the Leeds General Infirmary
V. On the Reduction of old Dislocations. By BERNARD E. BRODHURST, Assistant Surgeon to the Hospital
VI. On Traumatic Fever. By THOMAS P. PICK, Curator of the Pathological Museum
VII. On Paralysis of the Extensors. By REGINALD THOMPSON, M.D., F.R.S., Medical Registrar to the Hospital
VIII. Are there special Trophic Nerves? By HANDFIELD JONES, M.D., F.R.S., Physician to St. Mary’s Hospital
IX. On improved Methods of inducing and accelerating Labour, with the view of obtaining increased safety to Mother and Child. By ROBERT BARNES, M.D., Lecturer on Midwifery, &c. St. Thomas’s Hospital
X. On Counter-Irritation, considered in reference to the remote and indirect effects of local morbid changes. By W. H. DICKINSON, M.D., Assistant Physician to the Hospital
XI. A Hypothesis as to the ultimate destination of Glycogen. By WILLIAM OGLE, M.D., Assistant Physician to, and Lecturer on Physiology at the Hospital
XII. Case of Poisoning by Stramonium. By C. PAGET BLAKE, M.D. Edin., M.R.C.P. Lond., Consulting Physician to the Torbay Infirmary and Dispensary
XIII. Loss of Speech from the Bite of Venomous Snakes. By WILLIAM OGLE, M.D., Assistant Physician to the Hospital
XIV. Upon certain Morbid Conditions of the Appendages of the Liver. By JOHN W. OGLE, M.D., Physician to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Pathology
XV. A Case of Aneurysm. By R. J. LEE, M.B.
XVI. A Series of Fatal Cases of Poisoning. By JOHN W. OGLE, M.D., Physician to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Pathology
XVII. On the Treatment of Wounds by the application, of Carbolic Acid, on Lister’s method; showing the results of a Series of Cases so treated in this Hospital during the last few months. By T. HOLMES, Surgeon to the Hospital, and Lecturer on Surgery; and W. B. HOLDERNESSE, House-Surgeon to the Hospital
XVIII. Ophthalmic Department Report. By HENRY POWER, Ophthalmic Surgeon to the Hospital
XIX. Pathological Observations. By THOMAS P. PICK, Curator of the Pathological Museum
XX. Report of the Medical Cases admitted during the year 1867-8. By REGINALD E. THOMPSON, M.D., Medical Registrar
XXI. Report of the Surgical Cases treated during the year 1867. By WILLIAM LEIGH, Surgical Registrar
XXII. Address to the Students of the Hospital on the Opening of the New School, October 1,1868. By HENRY W. ACLAND, Regius Professor of Medicine in the University of Oxford, and Honorary Physician to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales

Post Mortem Examinations and Case Books

  • GB 406 PM
  • Coleção
  • 1840-1946

The post mortem records contain manuscript case notes, with medical notes both pre and post mortem. These include details on patients’ admission to the hospital, treatments and medication administered to patients and the medical history of patients; the medical histories were copied into the volumes from hospital registers, which are no longer extant. The post mortem cases include detailed pathological findings made during the detailed examination of the body after death. From the 1880s onwards the case books contain original anatomical drawings and photographs.

The following information is recorded for each case. The information is transcribed from the case notes and/or the relevant index and, where relevant, additionally standardised using MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)

• Name of the patient. If a name is not entered in the volume, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No name stated]’

• Gender of the patient (female / male / unknown)

• Age of the patient. Usually in numbers, following the original, with the following exceptions: 4/12 = 4 months, 4/52 = 4 weeks, 4/365 = 4 days. If no age is entered, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No age stated]’

• Occupation of the patient. Where no occupation is entered, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No occupation stated]’. Children are often designated according to their father’s or mother’s occupation and women by their husband’s occupation (e.g. ‘F / Horsekeeper’, ‘M. Charwoman’, ‘Hd Grocer’); these have been rendered in the catalogue as ‘[Child of] Horsekeeper’, ‘[Wife of] Grocer’

• Date of admission and date of death

• The names of the doctors treating or examining the patient. ‘Admitted under the care of’ denotes the senior doctor in charge of the case (usually entered at the top of the page and in the index); ‘Post mortem performed by’ denotes the doctor responsible for the post mortem examination (usually signed at the bottom of the page) and ‘Medical examination performed by’ denotes the doctor responsible for the medical examination prior to death (usually signed at the bottom of the page). The earliest records usually contain only one name, and some of the later ones may contain multiple names in each category. An authority record (name access point) with basic biographical details has been created for each doctor mentioned in the records; these can be used to explore all the cases related to a particular individual

• Disease(s) or cause of death of the patient. Transcribed from the medical case and/or the index and standardised, e.g. ‘Disease (transcribed): Phthisis. Fractured base. Disease (standardised): Tuberculosis (lungs). Fracture (skull)’

• Medical and post mortem notes. Brief summary description or transcription of the case notes relating to previous medical history (not a full transcription of the case notes)

• Note on whether the case includes illustrations or photographs; these can also be browsed via genre access points

• Note on whether the death was caused by trauma, accident or suicide

• Subject access points, using standardised terms from MeSH, with disease type (e.g. respiratory tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases) and anatomy type (e.g. cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system), which can be used for browsing all relevant cases

Note on transcriptions and abbreviations

Names have been silently expanded, e.g. Jas = James, Wm = William

Some common abbreviations and acronyms

AMCH = Atkinson Morley Convalescent Hospital, Wimbledon
BID = Brought in dead
COA = Condition on admission
F = Father
H or Hd = Husband
HP = House physician
HS = House surgeon
IP = In-patient
L = Left
M = Mother
MR or Med reg or Med r = Medical register or Medical registrar
MS = Museum specimen
OP = Out-patient
OPD = Out-patient department
OR = Obstetric register
PMH = Previous medical history
PH = Previous history
Pt or Pat = Patient
PM = Post mortem
R = Right
RF = Rheumatic fever
Ry = Railway
SR or Surg reg = Surgical register or Surgical registrar
TB = Tuberculosis
VD = Venereal disease

St George's Hospital, London