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St George's Hospital Medical School, London
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St George's Student Records Vol 6

Transcribed 21st century records book covering students who registered between 1857-1876 (student numbers 4615-5224). Some entries provide details of student qualifications, working life, dates of birth and death, and other information. Note on interior page refers to original 1846 register as handwritten by Dr Robert Nairne and later entries handwritten by George David Pollock. Also states that for the most part pupils sign their own names and the names of their parents or guardians.

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

European Collaborating Centres in Addiction Studies (ECCAS)

Papers relating to St George's, University of London involvement with the European Collaborating Centres in Addiction Studies.

Background:
Although formally named only in 1992, ECCAS was established in 1988/1989. Its origins and subsequent development can be traced back to discussions, held with officers of the European Commission in 1987/1988, identifying the need for a collaborative study to investigate the treatment of opiate addiction, using the substitute drug methadone, for the following reasons:

1 . The existence of wide differences in treatment regimes for opiate dependent individuals throughout the European Union. These differences were fuelled by controversy surrounding the side-effects of methadone, its abuse liability and dependence potential.

  1. The absence of sufficiently large samples.
  2. Differences in culture and drug legislation in Europe.

To carry out a study of this magnitude it was further understood that the research group would, in the first instance, need to develop standardised instruments, capable of collecting data from ten European countries.

Over the next three years ECCAS continued to hold discussions with the European Commission and finally in 1991 a contract was signed for the first Multi Centre Study in Europe to investigate 'Methadone Substitution Therapy and its Impact on HIV Risk Behaviours’.

After this first collaborative piece of work, ECCAS began welcoming new members to its growing group, developing other areas of interest such as training/education, and providing an environment in which members could discuss with colleagues across Europe a range of issues such as research, education and clinical treatment protocols. With an already established code of practice, ECCAS formalised its constitution at its 3rd Annual Assembly in Paris, France in April 1995.

Founder Members include:

Denmark, Embbedslaege Instiutionen, Arhus and Ringkobing
France, Centre Píerre Nicole, Paris
Germany, Klinik Fuer Allgemeine Psychiatrie, Essen
lreland, Drug Treatment Centre, Dublin
Italy, Dipartimento delle Dipendenze, Bergamo
Italy, Servizio Tossícodípendenze, Padova
Portugal, Cento Atendímento Toxicodependentes, Porto
Swtzerland, Fondation Phoenix, Geneva
Spain, Centro de Salud Mental 1, Oviedo
Spain, Servicio de Psiquiatria-Toxicomania, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona
United Kingdom, Division of Addictive Behaviour, St George’s Hospital Medical School, London

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

St George's Student Records Vol 7

Transcribed 21st century records book covering students who registered between 1876-1889 (student numbers 5225-5812). Some entries provide details of student qualifications, working life, dates of birth and death, and other information.

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

Papers of Professor Hamid Ghodse

Hamid Ghodse was born in Iran in 1938. He was the eldest son of a large family. His father was a civil servant and mother was headmistress, and he had many aunts all involved in education. Hamid first came to the UK in 1957 for a Scout Jubilee, celebrating the centenary of Baden Powell’s birth. His childhood nickname was “doctor” and was known among friends and family for his interest in psychology from his reading of books by Dostoyevski, Rousseau, Sartre and Freud. He was always interested in biology and the biological sciences so medicine met that interest more than any other subject. Hamid went on to study medicine at Tabriz University, Iran, and qualified as a doctor in 1965 and then came to the UK to work and then qualifying as a psychiatrist.

His addiction psychiatry career began with a placement at a Drug Dependency Units (DDU) at Hackney Hospital. Whilst there, he investigated the associations between opiate addiction and users’ dental problems, which led to his PhD. He then started to consider the medical indicators of drug misuse and designed a survey of the London casualty units that became very influential upon UK drug policy at the time, and the World Health Organization adopted the methodology as a practical means of monitoring the impact of drug abuse and related problems in A&E departments in many other countries.

In 1978 he took up an addiction psychiatry consultant/senior lecturer position at St George’s, where he would remain for the rest of his career, and was appointed in 1987 to the UK’s first chair in addictions. During his time at St George’s he established the Addictive Behaviour Academic Department that comprised hospital-based out-patients clinics, in-patient assessment, detoxification, recovery and rehabilitation wards, and community-based multidisciplinary therapeutic teams, and ran many educational courses and diplomas. On his retirement from the NHS set up the International Centre for Drug Policy at St George’s

Hamid as physician was (honorary) consultant to St George’s Drug Dependence Treatment Clinic and associated in patient units for over 25 years. From small, under resourced beginnings he tirelessly developed a comprehensive range of services and treatment programmes, including the first dedicated Drug and Alcohol Liaison Team, easy access community clinics in venues as diverse as Tooting Leisure Centre, and the High Support Team for the most challenging or complex cases. He was endlessly captivated by the kaleidoscope of pathology and behaviour that our patients could present with, and after retiring from clinical practice he continued to preside over the monthly Addictions Clinical Conference Forum, where his ability to dissect, analyse and reconstruct a case presentation was unrivalled. His compassion and supreme knowledge was an inspiration to us who worked with him. Respected by patients - for whom professorial status meant nothing - he was forever known by many as “Dr Godsie”. He was, of course, too polite to correct their mispronunciation!

His work with addicts led, in 1978, to a paper for the British Medical Journal on mortality among drug addicts in London. This instilled in him a belief that monitoring drug mortality data would contribute to the prevention and treatment of addiction, as well as informing policy. As a result he set up the National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths (np-SAD), which gathers information from a variety of voluntary sources to inform clinicians and policy makers on risks associated with premature death due to substance misuse

Hamid presided over a huge diversity of other aspects of academic medicine more widely through the NHS, the University, Department of Health, and the Home Office. From 2006-2009, he was Medical Director of the National Advisory Committee on Clinical Excellence Awards and he held Non-Executive Directorships of the National Patient Safety Agency and National Clinical Assessment Authority. He was also advisor to the Parliamentary and NHS Ombudsman, and Chair of the International Health Advisory Board of the Department of Health. University commitments included Chair of the Subject Panel of Psychiatry and coordinator of Higher Degrees Committee at the University of London, and visiting professor to Beijing University. In all these roles his ambition was to inculcate a fair and rigorous approach. The award of an honorary CBE in 1999 and a DSc by London University in 2002 acknowledged the outstanding contributions he had made to psychiatric services and academia during his professional career.

Furthermore his internationally led to him being a member of the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board from 1992 until his death, and in this period he was president 11 times. As Board president, he worked tirelessly and did much to ensure international cooperation among the community of nations in matters of international drug control, to which he brought his outstanding academic and scientific knowledge along with his excellent leadership and diplomatic skills.

Throughout his career Hamid was a prestigious author of over three hundred research articles, and author of several books the most well known being “Ghodse’s Drugs and Addictive Behaviour; A Guide to Treatment”. He was also the Editor of ‘International Psychiatry’ and a member of the editorial advisory board for the journal Addiction.

Hamid had two particular areas of interest, these being research into drug related deaths, and the need for education in addictions and substance misuse for health professionals. These two interests led to him setting up the National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths in 1997, and more latterly the Substance Misuse in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum project, work which continues to this day.

Through his work at St George's he established himself as a leading figure in addiction science and achieved many of his hopes and aspirations, such as the establishment of a range of undergraduate, postgraduate and multi-professional training courses in addiction. A major achievement of this work was the development of national guidance on the teaching of Substance Misuse in Undergraduate Medical Education.

Throughout his career Hamid supported and encouraged the development of many professional activities at the Royal College of Psychiatrists including being the Chair of the Addictions Faculty, founding member of the Academic Faculty, and member of the Board of International Affairs. He was also the Chair (2002-20120), of the Professors of Psychiatry Club. In 2011he received the Royal College of Psychiatrists Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of his contribution to addiction psychiatry.

March 6th 2018
C Goodair

Ghodse, Hamid

Post Mortem Examinations and Case Books

  • GB 406 PM
  • Collection
  • 1840-1946

The post mortem records contain manuscript case notes, with medical notes both pre and post mortem. These include details on patients’ admission to the hospital, treatments and medication administered to patients and the medical history of patients; the medical histories were copied into the volumes from hospital registers, which are no longer extant. The post mortem cases include detailed pathological findings made during the detailed examination of the body after death. From the 1880s onwards the case books contain original anatomical drawings and photographs.

The following information is recorded for each case. The information is transcribed from the case notes and/or the relevant index and, where relevant, additionally standardised using MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)

• Name of the patient. If a name is not entered in the volume, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No name stated]’

• Gender of the patient (female / male / unknown)

• Age of the patient. Usually in numbers, following the original, with the following exceptions: 4/12 = 4 months, 4/52 = 4 weeks, 4/365 = 4 days. If no age is entered, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No age stated]’

• Occupation of the patient. Where no occupation is entered, it is noted in the catalogue as ‘[No occupation stated]’. Children are often designated according to their father’s or mother’s occupation and women by their husband’s occupation (e.g. ‘F / Horsekeeper’, ‘M. Charwoman’, ‘Hd Grocer’); these have been rendered in the catalogue as ‘[Child of] Horsekeeper’, ‘[Wife of] Grocer’

• Date of admission and date of death

• The names of the doctors treating or examining the patient. ‘Admitted under the care of’ denotes the senior doctor in charge of the case (usually entered at the top of the page and in the index); ‘Post mortem performed by’ denotes the doctor responsible for the post mortem examination (usually signed at the bottom of the page) and ‘Medical examination performed by’ denotes the doctor responsible for the medical examination prior to death (usually signed at the bottom of the page). The earliest records usually contain only one name, and some of the later ones may contain multiple names in each category. An authority record (name access point) with basic biographical details has been created for each doctor mentioned in the records; these can be used to explore all the cases related to a particular individual

• Disease(s) or cause of death of the patient. Transcribed from the medical case and/or the index and standardised, e.g. ‘Disease (transcribed): Phthisis. Fractured base. Disease (standardised): Tuberculosis (lungs). Fracture (skull)’

• Medical and post mortem notes. Brief summary description or transcription of the case notes relating to previous medical history (not a full transcription of the case notes)

• Note on whether the case includes illustrations or photographs; these can also be browsed via genre access points

• Note on whether the death was caused by trauma, accident or suicide

• Subject access points, using standardised terms from MeSH, with disease type (e.g. respiratory tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases) and anatomy type (e.g. cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system), which can be used for browsing all relevant cases

Note on transcriptions and abbreviations

Names have been silently expanded, e.g. Jas = James, Wm = William

Some common abbreviations and acronyms

AMCH = Atkinson Morley Convalescent Hospital, Wimbledon
BID = Brought in dead
COA = Condition on admission
F = Father
H or Hd = Husband
HP = House physician
HS = House surgeon
IP = In-patient
L = Left
M = Mother
MR or Med reg or Med r = Medical register or Medical registrar
MS = Museum specimen
OP = Out-patient
OPD = Out-patient department
OR = Obstetric register
PMH = Previous medical history
PH = Previous history
Pt or Pat = Patient
PM = Post mortem
R = Right
RF = Rheumatic fever
Ry = Railway
SR or Surg reg = Surgical register or Surgical registrar
TB = Tuberculosis
VD = Venereal disease

St George's Hospital, London

Papers of St George's, University of London

  • GB 406 SGHMS
  • Collection
  • 1532-2019

The collection contains records created by St George's, University of London (formerly known as St George's Hospital Medical School). Medical school records include:

  • Minutes and papers of the School Council, Academic Board and other committees, 1862-2000

  • Student registers, record cards and certificates, 1752-1970s

  • Manuscripts relating to the early administration of the medical school

  • Institutional publications including school yearbooks, 1990-2014; directories, calendars and prospectus' relating to the school, 1852-c.1960

  • Photographs relating to the medical school and St George's Hospital, including photos of staff, students, events and sports teams, 19th century-21st century

  • Other miscellaneous materials

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

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