Education, medical

Taxonomy

Code

Scope note(s)

Source note(s)

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Equivalent terms

Education, medical

Associated terms

Education, medical

4 Authority record results for Education, medical

3 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Franglen, Geoffrey

  • Person

Vice-dean of St George's Medical School. Admissions assessor; developed an algorithm aimed at making the admission process more efficient in 1979 by automating the process. An inquiry in 1986 found, however, that the process was weighted against 'non-Caucasian' and female applicants. The Commission for Racial Equality found St George's guilty of racial and gender discrimination in its admission policy in 1988.

Hunter, John

  • GB/NNAF/P165880 (Former ISAAR ref: GB/NNAF/P14923 )
  • Person
  • 13 February 1728 – 16 October 1793

John Hunter (1728-1793) came to London in 1748 at the age of 20 and worked as an assistant in the anatomy school of his elder brother William (1718-83), who was already an established physician and obstetrician. Under William's direction, John learnt human anatomy and showed great aptitude in the dissection and preparation of specimens. William also arranged for him to study under the eminent surgeons William Cheselden (1688-1752) and Percivall Pott (1714-88).

Hunter was commissioned as an army surgeon in 1760 and spent three years in France and Portugal. As well as developing new ideas on the treatment of common ailments - such as gunshot wounds and venereal disease - Hunter spent time collecting specimens of lizards and other animals. On his return to England in 1763 he began to build up his private practice. His scientific work was rewarded in 1767 when he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. In 1768 he was elected Surgeon to St George's Hospital, and in 1783 he moved to a large house in Leicester Square, which enabled him to take resident pupils and to arrange his collection into a teaching museum.

Hunter devoted all his resources to his museum. It included nearly 14,000 preparations of more than 500 different species of plants and animals. As his reputation grew, he was supplied with rare specimens such as kangaroos brought back by Sir Joseph Banks from James Cook’s voyage of 1768-71.

While most of his contemporaries taught only human anatomy, Hunter's lectures stressed the relationship between structure and function in all kinds of living creatures. Hunter believed that surgeons should understand how the body adapted to and compensated for damage due to injury, disease or environmental changes. He encouraged students such as Edward Jenner and Astley Cooper to carry out experimental research and to apply the knowledge gained to the treatment of patients.

By the 1780s Hunter enjoyed widespread recognition as the leading teacher of surgery of his time. However, the acclaim did little to mellow his blunt-speaking and argumentative nature. His temper was to be his downfall: Hunter died in 1793 after suffering a fit during an argument at St George's Hospital over the acceptance of students for training.

Hunter is today remembered as a founder of `scientific surgery'. He was unique in seeking to provide an experimental basis to surgical practice, and his museum is a lasting record of his pioneering work

Lane, Samuel Armstrong

  • Person
  • 1802-1892

Educated at the Great Windmill Street School and St George’s Hospital. On his application as an assistant surgeon at St George’s in 1834, however, he was turned down in favour of Edward Cutler. Feeling he had been unfairly treated because Cutler was a relative of Benjamin Collins Brodie, Lane founded a rival anatomical school nearby at Grosvenor Place; the school soon became popular and was one of the schools attended by the pupils from St George’s Hospital.

Lane became senior surgeon to St Mary’s Hospital soon after its establishment in 1852, and Lane transferred his pathological and anatomical collections to the new school at St Mary’s Hospital. He also worked at the Lock Hospital. He was one of the original 300 fellows of the Royal College of Surgeons, and a member of the Council. He was also a fellow, member of the Council and vice-president of the Royal Medico-Chirurgical Society.

He was known as a skilled surgeon, and was one of the first to practice ovariotomy. He also performed the first successful blood transfer to treat haemophilia in 1840. He published a series of well-received articles on syphilis, however, being opposed to medical specialisms he refused to continue publishing on the subject.

He retired to Ealing, and died 2 Aug 1892, aged 90. His nephew James Robert Lane and his great-nephew James Ernest Lane continued his work at St Mary’s Hospital and with syphilis.

The School of Anatomy and Medicine adjoining St George's Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1827-1863

Established by a former student of St George’s, Samuel Armstrong Lane after being rejected from the post of assistant surgeon at St George’s Hospital in 1834. The school was housed at the back of Lane’s house on 1 Grosvenor Place, near St George’s Hospital on Hyde Park Corner, and soon became known as the School of Anatomy and Medicine adjoining St George’s Hospital. The school was in competition with the Kinnerton Street School, formally established in 1836, which became the official medical school for St George’s; pupils at the hospital could attend either of these schools, as well as a number of other anatomical schools. Lane became senior surgeon to St Mary’s Hospital soon after its establishment in 1852, and Lane transferred his pathological and anatomical collections to the new school at St Mary’s Hospital. Lane’s school closed down in 1863.