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Authority record

St George's Hospital Medical School, London

  • GB/NNAF/C43282 (Former ISAAR ref: GB/NNAF/O27447 )
  • Corporate body
  • 1752-

St George's, University of London (legal name St George's Hospital Medical School, informally St George's or SGUL), is a medical school located in Tooting in South West London. The Medical School shares a closely related history with St George's Hospital, which opened in 1733 at Lanesborough House, Hyde Park Corner in Central London. St George's was the second institution in England to provide formal training courses for doctors (after the University of Oxford). The Medical School became a constituent college of the University of London soon after the latter's establishment in 1836.

From the very beginning, the physicians and surgeons were permitted by the laws of the Hospital to have a limited number of pupils. A formal register of pupils was maintained from 1752. The earliest recorded course of lectures at the hospital was that delivered by Sir Everard Home some time before 1803. Prior to this, there were no lectures and little regular teaching at all in the Hospital other than what the students could pick up from the physicians and surgeons on their way round the wards. Attempts to remedy this situation were a cause of friction between renowned surgeon John Hunter and his colleagues. In 1793 they drew up a number of suggestions and regulations relating to the instruction and discipline of the pupils of the hospital.

From the beginning of the nineteenth century medical training became more structured, and pupils at St George's were required to learn anatomy at either Hunter's, Lane's, Carpue's or Brookes' schools of anatomy, which were private academies set up for this purpose. Chemistry was taught at the Royal Institution in Albermarle Street in addition to the clinical subjects which were dealt with at St George's Hospital.

Samuel Lane's anatomy school was known as 'The School of Anatomy and Medicine adjoining St George's Hospital'. Due to disagreement between Mr Lane and other medical officers at St George's, it was seen as essential to have a school of anatomy more closely connected to St George's and controlled by staff there. This led to surgeon Benjamin Brodie purchasing a house on Kinnerton Street, which he then leased back to St George's for use as an anatomy theatre, a lecture room and a museum. As a result of this, for 20 years there were now two rival schools associated with St George's. Attempts were made to amalgamate the two schools, but none succeeded. Finally the Kinnerton School moved to buildings attached to the hospital in 1868 and became the sole "Medical School of St George's Hospital". Lane's school closed down in 1863.

Although pupils were trained at the Hospital from its foundation, the medical school was not formally established until 1834 when it opened at the premises on Kinnerton Street. The formal opening ceremony for the school was held in 1835 in the Anatomy Theatre on the premises, and saw the dissection of an ancient Egyptian mummy.

In 1868 the medical school at Kinnerton Street was moved to the buildings at the south-west corner of the hospital site in Hyde Park itself, with the main entrance in Knightsbridge and the back entrance on Grosvenor Crescent Mews. Until 1946 the Medical School, although recognised as a School of London University, was controlled by a Medical School Committee, made up of honorary staff of the Hospital. In 1945 the Medical School Committee was divided into a School Council and an Academic Board.

In 1915, in response to wartime staff shortages, St George's admitted its first four female medical students. Just before the outbreak of World War Two, it was decided that Saint George's needed to be rebuilt on its Hyde Park Corner site. The plan was however abandoned by the commencement of the war. During the War, against a background of the population shift from central London, discussions took place which paved the way for Saint George's to be rebuilt and transferred out of the city centre. With the introduction of the National Health Service in 1948, the hospital became part of the Saint George's Hospital Teaching Group of the South West Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board. Soon after, the Board of Governors persuaded Aneurin Bevan, the Minister of Health, that the new Hospital should be built on the Grove Fever Hospital and Fountain Hospital sites in Tooting.

The building of the new Saint George's at Tooting, South West London, began in 1973. The first phase of the new Saint George's Hospital Medical School opened in 1976. The Hospital at Hyde Park closed its doors for the final time in 1980 and HM Queen Elizabeth II formally opened the new St George's Hospital and Medical School at Tooting on 6 November 1980.

Barclay, Andrew Whyte

  • Person
  • 1817-1884

Born in Fife. Educated at the Royal High School, Edinburgh. Spent a winter as a medical student at the Westminster Hospital. Qualified in 1838 and spent time in Germany, Italy, Switzerland and France before studying at Caius College, Cambridge 1842; MB 1847.

Medical registrar at St George's Hospital 1847, assistant physician 1857, physician 1862-1882, consulting physician, lecturer on materia medica and physic.

Lumleian lecturer, censor, Harveian orator and treasurer at the Royal College of Physicians. President of the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society 1881. Published 'Manual of Medical Diagnosis' 1851, and on heart disease. Chelsea's first medical officer of health, examiner on sanitary science in Cambridge.

Died at Stevenage.

Allingham, Herbert William

  • Person
  • 1862-1904

Entered St George's Hospital in 1879. Served as house surgeon in 1883-1884, and at the end of his term of office was appointed surgical registrar and demonstrator of anatomy. Elected assistant surgeon to St George's Hospital in 1894.

Elected assistant surgeon to St Mark's Hospital in 1885, resigning in 1890. In 1887 he became surgeon to the Great (now the Royal) Northern Hospital, a post he held until 1896. He was appointed surgeon in ordinary to the Prince of Wales, later King George V, having been previously surgeon to the household of King Edward VII. He also filled the offices of surgeon to the Surgical Aid Society and to the Osborn Home for Officers.

Back, Ivor Gordon

  • Person
  • 1879-1951

Educated at Marlborough College and Trinity Hall, Cambridge; graduated 1910 in natural sciences.

Medical student at St George's Hospital; qualified 1905, Allingham scholarship 1906, fellowship 1907. House surgeon, house physician and obstetric assistant at St George's Hospital; assistant surgeon 1910-1918, surgeon 1918-1938, consulting surgeon 1938-1943. Returned to work in 1943-1945; governor of the hospital 1951.

Won Albert Kahn travelling fellowship 1911, and wrote an account of his journey around the world. Served as a captain during the First World War in the RAMC at the 4th London General Hospital, the 54th General Hospital in France and as a surgical specialist at Catterick Camp, Yorkshire. Assistant surgeon at the Royal Waterloo Hospital for Women and Children, surgeon (proctologist) at the Grosvenor Hospital for Women. Examiner in surgery for Cambridge University. Active in Medical Defence Union, council member and president. Private practice in Queen Anne Street and later 4 Park Square West.

Married Barbara Nash; they had one son. Died 13 Jun 1951, aged 71.

Babington, George Gisborne

  • Person
  • 1795-1856

Born in Leicestershire.

Assistant surgeon at St George's Hospital 1829-1830, surgeon 1830-1843.

Surgeon at London Lock Hospital. Member of the Council at the Royal College of Surgeons 1836-1845, Hunterian Orator..

Speciality: Syphilitic diseases. Published on ulcers, sloughing sores and sexually transmitted diseases.

Married Sarah Anne Pearson of Golden Square in 1817. Died 1 Jan 1856 at home, 13 Queen's Gardens, Hyde Park

Banister, George

  • Person
  • 1819-1884

Born 17th October 1819. He entered St George's Hospital in 1836.

Banister entered the Bengal Army as Assistant Surgeon on 12th January 1845, being promoted Surgeon in 1858 and Surgeon Major in 1865. He was Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals from 1871 until his retirement in 1876. He saw active service in the Indian Mutiny, and was present at the seige and capture of Delhi, the operations in Rajputana, and the final campaign in Oudh, for which he received the Medal and Clasp.

He died at Eastbourne on 6th December 1884.

Bagshawe, Frederic

  • Person
  • 1834-1912

Born in Lancashire. Educated at Rossall and Uppingham. Studied arts at St John's College, Cambridge; graduated 1857. Studied medicine at Addenbrook's Hospital and St George's Hospital; MB 1863.

Held junior appointments at the Hospital for Sick Children. Physician to the Western General Dispensary. Spent several winters in southern France due to ill health, with a seasonal practice at St Leonards. Assistant physician to the Hastings, St Leonards and East Sussex Hospital 1871, physician 1882, consulting physician 1907.

Married Frances Boss in 1859 and in 1870 Emily Dickinson, sister of Dr W. Howship Dickinson. Died 2 Nov 1912.

Baldwin, Gerald Robert

  • Person
  • 1868-1942

Born at Dunedin, New Zealand in 1868, the son of Captain William Baldwin. He was educated at Dunedin High School and in Germany. After working in a solicitor's office and a bank at Dunedin, he entered the Otago Medical School at the age of twenty. To complete his training he entered St George's Hospital Medical School in 1889 and qualified in 1893.

At St George's Hospital he served as house physician and house surgeon. He held a resident appointment at the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street. He took the Fellowship at the end of 1894.

He settled at Melbourne, Australia in 1898, buying the practice of Stephen John Burke MRCS in north Melbourne. He was for some years on the staff of St Vincent's Hospital . He later practiced in other parts of Melbourne. For some years he practiced at Richmond and as a consultant in electrotherapy at Collins Street, Melbourne. He later went back to general practice at 183 Burke Road, Glen Iris, Melbourne. During the second world war he served as area medical officer for south-east Melbourne in the Royal Australian Air Force.

He married Ida M. Burke, the daughter of Stephen John Burke MRCS. He died on 8th July 1942, aged 74. He was survived by his wife, their son and three daughters.

Bull, William Henry

  • Person
  • ?-1921

Educated at St George's Hospital and took the diplomas of M.R.C.S in 1874 and of L.R.C.P.Lond. in 1875. He took the F.R.C.S.Edin in 1882.

House Surgeon and Assistant Surgical Registrar at St George's Hospital until he went into practice at Stony Stratford.

He held the Volunteer Decoration, and in 1913 he was appointed Honorary Surgeon to the King. He was a Knight of Grace of the Order of St John of Jerusalem and an honorary associate, lecturer and examiner for the St John Ambulance Association. He was a member of the British Medical Association and had been president of the South Midland Branch. He became a member of the Naval and Military Committee of the British Medical Association in October 1913. For many years was a member of the Bucks Territorial Force Association and was appointed Country Director of the Bucks branch of the British Red Cross Society.

Died at Stony Stratford on 14th August 1921. His son, Lieutenant G J O Bull, 2nd Field Company, East Lancashire was killed in the Dardanelles on 8th July 1915.

Carter, Henry Vandyke

  • Person
  • 1831-1897

Born in Hull, the son of painter Henry Barlow Carter and Eliza Barlow, he grew up in Scarborough. Educated at Hull Grammar School and St George's Hospital, graduating in 1852. Spent a year in Paris following his studies.

Studied anatomy at the Royal College of Surgeons on his return to London. Commissioned to make anatomical drawings for the St George's Hospital School of Medicine in 1853. Bachelor of Medicine at the University of London 1854, a degree he had initially failed the previous year. Demonstrator of anatomy at St George's Hospital.

He met Henry Gray at St George's around 1850, and worked with him to illustrate his books, most famously in 1856-1857 Gray's proposed anatomical textbook, which was to be known later as 'Gray's Anatomy'. Gray, however, did not credit Carter for his work on 'On the Structure and Use of the Spleen', 1851, and there were disagreements about acknowledgments as well as pay of Carter's later work.

Assistant surgeon IMS 1858. Professor of Anatomy and later principal at Grant Medical College. Published 'Spirillum fever, or famine fever, as seen in Western India' in 1882.

Retired with the rank of Deputy Surgeon General in 1888. Honorary surgeon to the queen 1890. Died at Scarborough 4 May 1897.

Bostock, Marian Noel

  • Person
  • 1891-1975

Grew up in Victoria, Canada. Daughter of Hewitt Bostock. British Columbia senator. Sent to school in England aged 15, educated at Prior's Field, Godalming.

Student at St George's Hospital Medical School 1914. MB, BS Lond 1917. MRCS, LRCP 1917. Surgical registrar, house surgeon, obstetric assistant and resident anaesthetist at St George's Hospital.

House physician at Queen's Hospital for Children in Hackney.

Missionary in India in 1922-1934, where she met her husband Victor Sherman. They moved to Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, where she founded the Humanist League of Canada. Chairperson of the mental hygiene committee for the Canadian Council of Women. Canadian Humanist of the Year 1975.

Canton, Frederick

  • Person
  • ?

Student at St George's Hospital Medical School 1867. MRCS 1871, LRCP 1872, LSA 1872, LDS 1875.

President of the Odontological Association.

Bennett, William Henry

  • Person
  • 1852-1931

Born at Chilmark, near Salisbury. Educated at Weymouth College and St George's Hospital, 1869 after a year with a GP in the country.

Won the Henry Charles Johnson prize for anatomy at St George's Hospital and various other prizes; demonstrator of anatomy 1871. Founded the 'Students' Journal and Hospital Gazette', 1873. Surgical registrar at St George's Hospital 1877. Travelled as Sir Watkin Wynn's medical attendant.

Appointed the first chloroformist of St George's Hospital 1879, a duty previously taken care of by the apothecary. Assistant surgeon at St George's Hospital 1880-1887, surgeon 1887-1905, consulting surgeon 1906-1931; governor and member of the house committee following his retirement in 1905; lecturer of surgery 1877-1899.

Examiner in anatomy at the Royal College of Surgeons 1884-1893. Member of the Court of Examiners 1897-1902. Inspector of anatomy for the metropolis. KCVO in 1901. Served at the British Red Cross and the Order of St John during World War I; appointed Knight of Grace of the Order of St John of Jerusalem. Commander of the Royal Order of the Redeemer of Greece. Chairman of the Invalid Children's Association. President of the Institute of Hygiene and of the Illuminating Engineers Society.

Married Isobel Lloyd Dickinson (d.1911) and Gladys Florence Hartigan of Monkstown, Co Dublin and St Leonards-on-Sea in 1914 (d.1949). Died in London at 3 Hyde Park Place 24 Dec 1931.

Blagden, Robert

  • Person
  • 1825-1898

Student at St George's Hospital 1844; MRCS 1849. Surgical registrar and surgeon at St George's Hospital.

Surgeon at St James's Dispensary. Moved to Stroud, Gloucestershire in 1861. Honorary assistant surgeon at Gloucestershire Volunteers. Moved to Minchinhampton near Stroud in 1890. Surgeon at Minchinhampton Dispensary.

Died at Teddington 22 Oct 1898, aged 73.

Bright, George Charles

  • Person
  • 1840-1922

The son of Richard Bright F.R.C.P, G.C. Educated at Rugby and Balliol College, Oxford, were he graduated with first-class honours in natural science in 1863. He studied medicine at St George's Hospital, and also at Edinburgh and Paris.

His first practice was in London and he held appointments at St George's Hospital as lecturer on comparitive anatomy, and at St George's and St James's Dispensary as physician.

He married in 1869 and soon after left London for the Continent. He practiced for a time in Dresden but in 1875 settled permanently in Cannes. One of the subjects of his research was the condition of the air in hospital wards.

He died on 21st January 1922 in Cannes, survived by his wife and three daughters.

Brodie, George Bernard

  • Person
  • 1839-1919

Son of Charles George Brodie, nephew of Sir Benjamin Brodie.

Student at St George's Hospital; qualified in 1862.

Obstetrician. Private practice. Attended the birth of Princess Alice in 1868. Physician to Queen Charlotte's Lying-In Hospital. Physician-accoucheur to St George's, Hanover Square Dispensary.

Married in 1893 Mary Maxwell of St Petersburg; they had one daughter and three sons. Died 27 May 1919.

Claremont, Hetty Ethelberta

  • Person
  • 1892-1924

Educated at King Alfred School, Hampstead, an unusual establishment for its time in that it advocated co-education, without distinction between boys and girls; her mother was involved in running it. Her grandfather
and several other relatives were members of the medical profession.

Student at the London Royal Free Hospital, School of Medicine for Women and St George's Hospital; awarded John Hunter gold medal. Conjoint diploma of the Royal Colleges 1916; MB, B.S.Lond. 1917. LRCP 1916, MRCS
1916; fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1920, aged 27. Master of Surgery of the University of London.

She was one of the first four women admitted to St George�s medical school (the other three were Elizabeth O�Flynn, Mariam Bostock and Helen Ingleby). House surgeon, house physician, resident
anaesthetist and surgical registrar at St George's Hospital; casualty officer and assistant in the venereal disease department.

Voluntary resident surgeon to the university clinic in Z�rich, Switzerland; visited clinics at Vienna, Budapest, Frankfurt and Madrid during the year. On her return to England, appointed surgeon to the Bermondsey Medical Mission, surgical registrar to the London Temperance Hospital, clinical assistant at the out-patient department of the South London Hospital for Women, clinical assistant to the Women's Lock Hospital. Private practice in London.

Died 27 Mar 1924 of bronchopneumonia following typhoid fever, despite efforts to find a suitable blood donor on time, broadcast through the London wireless station.

On becoming a medical student at the former institution "her extremely youthful appearance" evoked comment, but her independence of thought, concentration, and great perseverance soon gained the respect of all who could appreciate a character set on achievement and inspired by the tradition of her family. Sir Humphry Rolleston, writing of her work at the Hospital Museum, says that he came to respect "her high ideals and practical efficiency", and both he and Mrs Scharlieb bore witness to the keenness of her intellect and her personal charm.

Champneys, Francis Henry

  • Person
  • 1848-1930

Born in London. Educated at Winchester College, Brasenose College, Oxford and St Bartholomew's Hospital; BM 1875, MD 1888. Radcliffe travelling fellowship at Oxford University 1872; studied at Vienna, Leipzig and Dresden.

Assistant obstetric physician at St George's Hospital 1880-1885; obstetric physician 1885-1891.

Obstetric physician to the General Lying-in Hospital, York Road. Physician accoucheur to St Bartholomew's Hospital 1891-1913.

Fellow of the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society and the Royal College of Physicians. President of the Royal Society of Medicine, 1912. Campaigned for raising the status of midwives; first chairman of the Central Midwives' Board 1902-1930; campaigned for the Midwives Act 1902. Crown nominee 1911-1926 of the General Medical Council. Baronet 1910. Involved in founding the British College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in 1929.

Married Virginia Julian Dalrymple in 1876; they had three sons and one daughter. Died 31 Jul 1930 aged 83 at his home in Nutley, Sussex, and buried at Hampstead cemetery. His son Weldon Dalrymple-Champneys was also a physician.

Braine, Francis Woodhouse

  • Person
  • 1837-1907

Born in London, son of Dr James William Braine, the first of 11 children.

Studied at St George's Hospital, 1854; house surgeon, surgical registrar, demonstrator of anatomy; private assistant to George Pollock, surgeon at the hospital.

Resident medical officer at the Children's Hospital, Great Ormond Street. He was offered the post of chloroformist, which he reluctantly accepted, following the resignation of Henry Potter, chloroformist to St George's Hospital after the death of a patient; Braine took over Potter's practice in Maddox Street, and became an early specialist in the administration of anaesthetics. Anaesthetist to the Dental Hospital in London 1868-1894; vice-president of theh hospital on his retirement. Braine was the first in England to adopt the use of nitrous oxide gas for anaesthesia. Anaesthetist to St Peter's Hospital for Stone. One of the founders and the first president of the Society of Anaesthetics, 1893-1895. Honorary secretary and vice-president of the Medical Society of London. Published on anaesthetics.

Married twice. Died 28 Oct 1907; buried at Harrow.

Barnes, Edgar George

  • Person
  • 1848-?

Born in Suffolk. LSA 1869, MRCS, MB London 1870, MD 1873.

Student at St George's Hospital Medical School 1866. Obstetric assistant at St George's Hospital 1871.

Medical officer of health in the Eye Urban District, Suffolk 1873-1913. President of the East Anglian branch of British Medical Association 1888. President of the Norwich Medico-Chirurgical Society 1882. Physician at Glete House Asylum, Aspall. Surgeon Lieutenant at 2nd Suffolk Volunteers. President of the Medical Defence Union 1912-15. County director for Jersey.

Published on infectious diseases.

Retired to Jersey 1918.

Cahill, John

  • Person
  • 1857-1919

Educated at Beaumont College, Windsor and in Germany. Studied at Durham and St George's Hospital.

House surgeon at St George's Hospital, 1877. Later a member of the Committee of Management, and Temporary Assistant Physician during WWI. Worked as a GP; private practice at 12 Seville Street, Lowndes Square. Surgeon to the Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth. Medical adviser to the Egyptian Civil Service, Member of the Medical Commissioners' Board.

Married Lucy Keith in 1887. They had two daughters and one son, Captain Archibald Cahill, who was killed in action in 1917. He died 6 Sep 1919.

Bull, William Charles

  • Person
  • 1858-1933

Born in Cheshire, son of a Liverpool merchant. Educated at Hereford Cathedral School and Caius College, Cambridge 1877; BA 1881 in natural sciences.

House surgeon and surgical registrar at St George's Hospital from 1881, until he moved temporarily to Switzerland due to tuberculosis. On his return to England, he worked as an assistant to Sir William Dalby and as a surgeon to the Belgrave Hospital for Children.

Appointed aural surgeon and lecturer on aural surgery at St George's Hospital in 1892, following Dalby, and consulting aural surgeon in 1912.

Married Amy Flemmick of Roehampton in 1895; they had one daughter. He died 24 Feb 1933.

Barker, William Levington

  • Person
  • ?

Born in Berkshire.

Student at St George's Hospital 1860; MRCS 1863, LRCP 1864. House surgeon 1865.

Prosector at Royal College of Surgeons. Lived in 22 Cheyne Row, Chelsea

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